Tag Archives: normal

Blindness

14 Oct

by Valerie Moreno (re-post from August 2012)

Blindness by Valerie Moreno

 

We are told to be strong
act “normal”
make the first move
prove we are
 just like everyone else
 
Then, people shout in our face
yank us across a street
ask the person with us
 what we’d like to eat
 
After all the assurances
suggestions
playing down assumptions and
 comparisons to other unseeing people
 
I walk away alone,
 knowing I am not the only person
 who cannot see
 

Valerie Moreno had partial vision until 1999 when it disappeared literally overnight.  Valerie’s eye disease is ROP (Retinopathy of Prematurity).  She is recently widowed, has a blind cat who she adores and loves to write.  She doesn’t have a computer, so she uses a phone voice-internet service called Net-By-Phone, which sends and receives email and browses the web.  Text emails and webpages are read in robotic speech and all texting is done via phone keypad.

Valerie says that Vision Through Words feels like a safe place to go to. Thank you, Valerie!

Normal

30 Sep

by Stella De Genova

Life is all about what we’re used to. We give it the title of “normalcy.”  My normal day is probably very different from yours.  What is normal to one person can be absurdly abnormal to another.  So what is normal and should we be too concerned about it?

The definition of normal in the dictionary is: 1. conforming to the standard or the common type; usual; not abnormal; regular; natural. 2. serving to establish a standard. 3. In Psychology. A. approximately average in any psychological trait, as intelligence, personality, or emotional adjustment. B. free from any mental disorder; sane.

Well OK, I’m pretty certain I would like to be thought of as “sane” but “usual” and “regular?” That doesn’t sound like much fun!  Even if you look at your own life, what’s normal never stays the same.  What was normal then may not be normal now.  For instance, when you lose a loved one or even a pet, life can’t get much more abnormal than that.  But people will tell you that in time, you will get back to some sort of normalcy in your life.  So, normalcy can be very different than you ever knew it to be.

And what about many of the readers of this blog who are blind? Our normal is about as far away from what a sighted person may consider to be normal.  Does that make us abnormal or just different?  Remember when you were a kid and teachers and parents told you to “dare to be different?”  Honestly, I can’t compare what I do to someone else that is so different because it’s not different to me at all.  True, I have to use a color detector and I listen to a good book instead of read it.  I can’t just zoom off in my own car to pick up some groceries and I don’t even work the job I was used to working for almost 18 years.  But what I do every day now is my routine and I still take care of my home and family.  I accept the challenge to find new ways to be creative and creative ways to do things in a new way.  As it turns out, my normal works just fine for me and that’s really what it’s all about, isn’t it?

Blindness

28 Aug

by Valerie Moreno

We are told to be strong
act “normal”
make the first move
prove we are
 just like everyone else
 
Then, people shout in our face
yank us across a street
ask the person with us
 what we’d like to eat
 
After all the assurances
suggestions
playing down assumptions and
 comparisions to other unseeing people
 
I walk away alone,
 knowing I am not the only person
 who cannot see

Valerie Moreno is 57 years old.  She had partial vision until 1999 when it disappeared literally overnight.  Valerie’s eye disease is ROP (Retinopathy of Prematurity).  She is recently widowed, has a blind cat who she adores and loves to write.  She doesn’t have a computer, so she uses a phone voice-internet service called Net-By-Phone, which sends and receives email and browses the web.  Text emails and webpages are read in robotic speech and all texting is done via phone keypad.

Valerie says that Vision Through Words feels like a safe place to go to.  Thank you, Valerie!

Our Normal Life

7 Nov

by Stella De Genova

Fragments of Parenthood invites people to share their parenting experiences on Facebook and here’s something I posted:

Whose to say what is or isn’t normal?  I was born with a retina disease called retinitis pigmentosa.  I’ve had “night blindness” since childhood.  I am now legally blind and left with some central vision and fading colors.  I was married, had 3 children, was divorced and raised my kids as a single-parent through the tough teenage years.  For the most part, my kids didn’t know I had any sort of condition.  When they were babies and awoke in the night, I could hear and feel to help them, turning on a lamp if necessary.  I read them bedtime stories and helped with homework.  I couldn’t drive but we took buses or trains to the beach and summer city fests.  If we were away from home at night, they knew to hold my hand to help me more than I helped them.  I will admit that when I trimmed my daughters’ bangs, they were pretty lopsided but I worked fulltime and could pay for professional repair.  I may not have seen my son sneaking to the snack cabinet at midnight but I caught him in the act because I could hear the crunching.  Then there was the time I served my daughter buttermilk instead of milk and she ran to the sink to spit it out.  Teenage years were based on trust and since they were teens, not always so trustworthy.  But we all survived each other.  Now that my kids are grown, they help me get to the train, help me read the mail and make sure the food I prepare is not spoiled or something it shouldn’t be.

Was it abnormal for my kids to have a visually impaired parent?  I asked them and they said no, it’s just our life.  I was always there for them and now they are here for me.  Can’t get more normal – or better than that.