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Checkbooks Roasting

12 Dec

by Nancy Scott (sing to “The Christmas Song” melody)

Checkbooks roasting on an open fire.

Credit going up in flame.

Balance minimums are down to the wire.

Collection people know your name.

 

QVC and HSN are much too willing to

help you spend more than you make

and they’ll ship all your goodies to you

so everyone’s in on the take.

 

They know that you can’t help but buy

the clothes and jewelry and food and not ask why.

Appliances and lock and locks

you just can’t wait until you receive your next box.

 

And so I’m offering this simple tale

to warn you not to be in debt.

Make gifts or just buy them when they are on sale.

Happy giving. You bet.

 

Nancy Scott, Easton, PA, is a blind essayist and poet. Her over 600 bylines have appeared in magazines, literary journals, anthologies and newspapers, and as audio commentaries. An essayist and poet, she has published three chapbooks. She won First Prize in the 2009 International Onkyo Braille Essay Contest. Recent work appears in Breath and Shadow, Contemporary Haibun Online, and Stone Voices.

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Unrequited

30 Nov

by Valerie Moreno

I stand alone

shivering in chilly,

condescending winds of

unacceptance.

 

You are “too busy”

to give me a chance,

look at me as a

person instead of a

symbol of blindness.

 

You won’t meet me

half-way, I feel it

like a hard slap against my cheek.

 

Rejection stings for a time,

reminding me to appreciate my self…

Again, I gather my strength,

assess my ability,

believing someone wiser will

accept who I am.

But know everything lost will be recovered

when you drift in to the arms

of the undiscovered

Valerie Moreno is 59 and a published writer. She writes poetry, memoir, fiction and articles. Her eye disease is ROP (Retinopathy of Prematurity. Some favorite hobbies include reading, raised line drawing, music and singing.

Peaches

7 Nov

by Reja-e-Busailah

The two peaches came from opposite orchards.

They waited to be picked up by some buyer or another;

it was late when the two men,

brothers in trade, arrived.

They examined the peaches and shook their heads:

 

“Who on earth would eat such peaches!”

exclaimed the one: “One peach with so much sugar,

but with hardly any juice!

While the other with so much juice,

but with hardly any sugar!”

 

“You nailed it on the head,” agreed the other,

“just what I have been meaning to talk to you about:

I have a son,

and you have a son,

right?

Your son is blind but smart,

my son is sighted but dumb!

Now is that fair, I ask you?

What would a dim-eyed person do with a brain?

Wouldn’t God have done better

if he had given the brain of your son

to my son who sees but is a dimwit?

At least there would then be one good peach

don’t you think so?”

 

Shocked, the other would-be buyer said,

“You must ask God that.”

 

The two peaches heard all that

and nodded as if to say,

“The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away.”

“I wouldn’t for the world,

sweet sister, covet your sugar!”

“Nor would I for the whole world,

my good sister, covet your juice!”

 

Reja-e-Busailah was born in Jerusalem and now lives in Indiana, U.S. He has been totally blind since infancy, from before the end of his first year. He has published poems in a variety of little magazines on different subjects. This poem and the next that Vision Through Words will post are from a collection of poems, Poems Out of Sight, which he hopes to publish in the near future. Reja-e also in the process of having a memoir about his childhood published within the next few months.

Blue Vibrations

22 Oct

by Crystal Howe

Blue is my favorite color,

Though I really can’t say why.

I’ve never seen the ocean,

The flowers or the sky,

The hue of sweetest berries,

Or my child’s sparkling eyes.

But blue’s my favorite color,

And maybe I know why:

The peace of its vibration,

The healing it provides,

The grace so all-embracing,

A deeper touch than sight.

O blue’s my favorite color,

A blessing of the Light!

 

Crystal Howe has been legally blind since birth and lost all light perception at age 12, after a difficult struggle with Glaucoma. She is an ordained minister with a Doctorate Degree in  Metaphysical Science. Crystal especially enjoys songwriting, poetry, weaving, and trying new coffee  flavors.

Think Autumn, Think Color

11 Oct

Two new poems by Nancy Scott.  Feel the color!

A BLIND WRITER COLORS

Sunday is brown

seeds of reading and TV, eating

too much and calling long distance.

 

Monday is white

space for lists and ledgers, guilts

and promises of the busy and brave.

 

Tuesday is black

ink and thinking

even if your computer talks.

 

Wednesday is orange

flame of waiting and impatience.

 

Thursday is red

accounting for cross-outs and surprise

or blue accounting for not understanding

 

Friday is green

pay-off and fruit

for all to see

 

Saturday is pink or purple or yellow

depending on whim or preference

 

 

AUTUMN AIR for Carole

Poets know fall sounds clearest.

We hear geese fly—

skeins of high, V-shaped leaving

even through closed windows.

Half-time bands reverb

off houses we’ve lived in for years,

defining solidity and reminding

that drums can be heard from a distance.

Leaves crunch and schoolchildren run,

late again

lured by night sounds and atmosphere.

 

I thought I alone

heard one autumn cricket sing

beyond my screen

until you wrote

your late-October soloist.

Do these solitary minstrels

favor poets’ yards

or is this chance or curse

heard by anyone listening

for muffled, crack-crystal winter?

 

Nancy Scott, Easton, PA, is a blind essayist and poet. Her over 600 bylines have appeared in magazines, literary journals, anthologies and newspapers, and as audio commentaries. An essayist and poet, she has published three chapbooks. She won First Prize in the 2009 International Onkyo Braille Essay Contest. Recent work appears in Breath and Shadow, Contemporary Haibun Online, and Stone Voices.

Unrequited

26 Sep

by Valerie Moreno

I stand alone

shivering in chilly,

condescending winds of

unacceptance.

 

You are “too busy”

to give me a chance,

look at me as a

person instead of a

symbol of blindness.

 

You won’t meet me

half-way, I feel it

like a hard slap against my cheek.

Rejection stings for a time,

reminding me to appreciate my self…

 

Again, I gather my strength,

assess my ability,

believing someone wiser will

 accept who I am.

 

Valerie Moreno is 59 and a published writer. She writes poetry, memoir, fiction and articles. Her eye disease is ROP (Retinopathy of Prematurity. Some favorite hobbies include reading, raised line drawing, music and singing.

What a Feeling!

16 Sep

by Andrea Kelton

The easel

Holds a painting

Featuring a free-form tree

Under an explosive yellow sun.

 

The artist

Brush in hand

Stands back

Admiring her masterpiece.

 

Satisfaction bubbles

Then

Glee gushes and rushes

Through her four-year-old body.

 

Andrea glows with wonder

At this treasure she’s created.

 

Emotions explode

As she discovers

That

Doing art

Creates bliss.

 

Andrea Kelton was diagnosed with uveitis at 24. Her diverse artistic life included photography and ceramics.  She taught pottery in her own Chicago storefront studio for 15 years.  Andrea attends a memoir writing class taught by author, Beth Finke.