Archive | August, 2016

Songbird Sing

25 Aug

by Crystal L. Howe

Soaring high above the clouds

Of chaos in my mind,

I know there is a song to sing

With words I cannot find.

 

I hunt and peck and try in vain

To force the music out

And feel the pangs of harsh regret

That feed the fire of doubt.

 

The time has come to let it go

And set the songbird free!

For only when the spirit soars

Can any songbird sing!

 

I learn to find the hidden nest

Of peace within my mind,

Where love consoles and lifts me over

All the thoughts that bind.

 

There are no words to look for here,

No melody to sing;

The music of this sacred place

The Spirit plays within.

 

So, take the time to let it go

And set the songbird free!

For only when the spirit soars

Can you, the songbird, sing!

Crystal has been legally blind since birth and lost all light perception at age 12, after a difficult struggle with Glaucoma. She is an ordained minister with a Doctorate Degree in Metaphysical Science. Crystal especially enjoys songwriting, poetry, weaving, and trying new coffee flavors. (You can listen to or download this song at the following link: https://mysticalstrings.files.wordpress.com/2016/06/songbird_sing.mp3)

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No Face in the Mirror

11 Aug

by Marcia J. Wick

Stumbling over my guide dog, I make my way to the bathroom getting ready to meet a new day. But I cannot see how I will greet the day, even though I am standing in front of the mirror. The reflection of my face in the mirror is disappearing due to my progressive vision loss.

Whether I start my day feeling like death warmed over, or I wake refreshed and ready to put my best face forward, it is the same reflection I see. Soft and fuzzy at the edges. Clouds and vapor off which the light bounces and flickers. Pixilated glimpses at a part of my nose and expressionless orbits for eyes. No use worrying about plucking my eyebrows or checking for blemishes.

Although my days are dimming, there is a silver lining. Not seeing how I look in the mirror presents an unexpected opportunity for me to use my mind’s eye.  I tell myself, “You look great!” My fading image forces me to let go of judgments I might heap upon myself if I could actually make out my finer features.

My progressive vision loss helps to keep my steady aging process at bay, at least as far as I can see! Staring ahead while brushing my teeth, I do not discern the crow’s feet seeking permanent residency at the outside corners of my mouth and eyes, nor can I perceive the pervasive grey masking my former dark brown hair color. If I squint, I can almost imagine myself as a blond bombshell.

When the face looking back at you from the mirror disappears, you have the chance to imagine yourself in a new way. If you frown at the bathroom mirror first thing in the morning, you might lock in a picture of how you will look to others during the course of your day.

There is an advantage to not judging yourself by how you appear in a mirror day after day. If you have some vision, consider taping a picture of someone else’s face at just the right size and height to block out your own image. Look at you! You look as great as Wonder Woman Linda Carter or Clark Kent as Superman! Your eyes are bright and your hair and brows are trim. Your teeth could not look more brilliant, and your neck is tucked firmly out of sight under your chin.

You look great! You feel great! You smile! When you lose sight of your own face in the mirror, you can imagine Sophia Loren or someone rich, powerful and influential. I promise you will feel happier and more confident about facing the day when you fancy a new face in the mirror.

Marcia Wick is enjoying new adventures with her first guide dog, Viviane, a 60-pound yellow lab from Guide Dogs for the Blind. Marcia is legally blind due to Retinitis Pigmentosa. Recently retired, her career included newspaper reporting, public relations, communications and publishing.  With two daughters now grown and a grandson, Marcia is returning to her writing roots in partnership with her sister, Jennifer Walford, as The Write Sisters. She also advocates for public transit, the Visually Impaired and Blind Skiers , and currently serves on the GDB Alumni Association Board of Directors.  Marcia lives in Colorado Springs with her husband and Viviane.

Tribute to Tania

3 Aug

by Terri Winaught

I wish I could have known you, baby girl: born in a decade of challenge, change, pain and promise.

I wish I would have known you when your voice became a harp that enchanted listeners, soared to the sky like a robin and sang the sun to sleep.

If I would have known you when cancer began stealing so much like the cowardly, cruel thief that it is, I would have shaved my head if that would have helped you feel less alone and different.

When I get to meet you, I’ll have so much to tell you.

I’ll tell you how happy I was to meet your father after 50 years of waiting and wanting.

I’ll tell you what a warm, welcoming and gentle woman your mother is.

I’ll tell you that your daughter is such a precious, priceless gift that your soul must have sung lullabies of love when you first saw her.

I know I’ll get to meet you when the fevered pitch of my earthly life is done, and I’m called to my eternal home.

With eyes that will see for the first time, I’ll survey the features that make you special; embrace you, Tania, as if I’ve always known you, and our dancing feet will create works of beauty.

When trumpets blare along gold-paved streets, we’ll know that our tears have turned into rejoicing, and life is now complete!

 

Terri Winaught was born March 13th, 1953 in Philadelphia, PA.  Being born three months prematurely is what caused her blindness, which is total except for some light perception in her left eye. She loves her work at a local mental-health facility.  She enjoys writing, singing, going out with friends, and listening to soul music from the 1960’s, especially that of Garnet Mimms, whose daughter her poem is about.