Archive | January, 2013

A Nancy Drew Mystery

26 Jan

by Andrea Kelton

When I was a first grader, I lived on Staten Island where my books came from the bookmobile.  I stood at the curb, eagerly awaiting the enormous lumbering library on wheels.  Inside, I seriously deliberated over oh so many choices. Finally, I would decide which books would be mine for the week.  My three picture book limit in hand, I would devour them by days end.  Fortunately, I had a monthly subscription to Highlights magazine.  The puzzles, short stories and crafts held me over until the next bookmobile visit.

When I was a sixth grader, I lived in St. Clair Shores, Michigan.  I had a huge crush on Norm Cash, the Detroit Tigers first baseman.  Daily, I waited for the Detroit News.  I’d clip out every article chronicling his homerun streak, glue it into my Norm Cash scrapbook and read them over and over.

When I was an eighth grader, the nuns at St. Gertrude’s told us that Nancy Drew books were not to be read.  I had never    heard of censorship, but I was used to the Catholics always telling me there was something I couldn’t say, see or think.  But what could be wrong with these books?  When I asked “why?” no answer was ever given.  I asked, “What should we read?”   And I was told Little Women and The Bobbsey Twins.

I’d already read those books.  How many times was I supposed to read them?  Now these banned books intrigued me.  I really wanted to read Nancy Drew.  Lucky for me, Patti Rex lived down the street and owned the entire series.  So I promptly devoured each and everyone.  They were fun to read.  But that was all.  Nothing nasty or immoral.  I sure didn’t get it.

Still to this day, the only unsolved Nancy Drew mystery is why the nuns objected to these books.  I wonder what they would think of Father Andrew Greeley’s mysteries.

Andrea Kelton was diagnosed with uveitis in 1974.  Today she lives in Chicago and teaches Adult Basic Education at Literacy Chicago.  She attends a weekly memoir writing class, “Me, Myself and I” taught by author Beth Finke.

Hand Blind

22 Jan

by Nancy Scott

Too much grasping,

too much stroking and guessing,

too much need for fur and feathers,

too much checking for dust.

 

In alchemy of rebellion,

my hand turns touch to sand,

invents grit and friction

till skin peels

its release from feeling.

 

Slender fingers of my youth

demand different attention–

lotions, cocoa-butter soaps

and less time in water.

 

Now, I am grateful

to have the brush of healing

when flannel feels soft,

to find dust with conviction

and to read Braille with silken speed

of ungloved second sight.

 

Nancy Scott’s over-600 bylines have appeared in magazines, literary journals, anthologies and newspapers, and as audio commentaries. An essayist and poet, she has published three chapbooks.

Recent work appears in  Breath and Shadow,  Contemporary Haibun Online, and Thema.  She won First Prize in the 2009 International Onkyo Braille Essay Contest.

New Year – New Writers

18 Jan

Vision Through Words started posting poetry and essays written by visually impaired authors back in 2011.  We’ve posted stories and poems that have made us laugh and made us cry, some about our blind experiences and some just to touch the heart, sighted or not.  If you haven’t followed us from the beginning, take a journey into the archives and discover the talent within.  If you’ve been following the blog, maybe it’s time you try your hand at writing and submitting in 2013.  Getting in tune with your creative self is theraputic, rewarding and fun.  All you have to do is send something you think is good enough to share with the world to visionthroughwords@gmail.com .  If it fits our guidelines (click on the Submission tab for more info), you’ll get posted!

HAPPY WRITING!

Blind

11 Jan

by James Langston Hughes

I am blind
I cannot see.
Color is no bar to me.
I know neither
Black nor white.
I walk in night.
Yet it seems I see mankind
More tortured than the blind.
Can it be that those who know
Sight are often doomed to woe?
Or is it that, seeing,
They never see
With the infinite eyes
Of one like me?

James Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born in Missouri and was an activist, columnist, playwright, musician and poet.  Did he write about mankind’s blindness or was he actually blind?

Like Walking on the Moon

4 Jan

by Nancy Scott

Snow casts unprotected streets
in dust of not known.
No curbs, no stairs, no echoes
of familiar buildings to speak
straight lines.  No traffic
to plot; no cement to tap
in the rhythm that has
no excuse for staying home.
My cane makes a poor shovel
in the shuffle of this new gravity.
I stretch to catch the flakes
of white luck in my eyes.
I know the Moon is watching
and She approves.
 

Nancy Scott’s over-600 bylines have appeared in magazines, literary journals, anthologies and newspapers, and as audio commentaries. An essayist and poet, she has published three chapbooks.  –  Recent work appears in  Breath and Shadow,  Contemporary Haibun Online, and Thema.  She won First Prize in the 2009 International Onkyo Braille Essay Contest.